The Governor’s Mansion

California governors lived in their own private homes until 1903, when the state purchased and furnished a property at the corner of Sixteenth and H Streets in Sacramento as a home for California’s first families. The multi-story, Victorian-era Italianate-style residence was built in 1877 by Albert and Clemenza Continue reading The Governor’s Mansion

The Stanford Mansion

The loss of his law library to fire in 1852 prompted New York attorney Leland Stanford to migrate to California, to join brothers who were already successful merchants in Gold Rush Sacramento. Leland managed the Stanford Brother’s wholesale business on K Street, became wealthy, and involved himself in local politics.  In Continue reading The Stanford Mansion

The Sacramento Valley Railroad

From the early 1800s New England boasted railroads, factories, and telegraph lines–but prior to the Gold Rush, California was a pastoral land with none of these hallmarks of civilization. The first railroad west of the Mississippi was the Sacramento Valley Railroad, officially opened for passenger and freight transport in Continue reading The Sacramento Valley Railroad

General Mariano Vallejo

Long before the United States acquired California from Mexico, Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo was already an important man. Born in Monterey to an aristocratic Spanish family 15 years before Mexico achieved its independence from Spain and assumed control of California, he was educated by tutors and maintained a love of Continue reading General Mariano Vallejo

The Pioneers: Edwin Bryant

Edwin Bryant, the author of What I Saw in California (published in 1848) was a Kentucky journalist who undertook the perilous overland journey in 1846 as a literary mission, intending to write a first-hand report on the advantages and disadvantages of life on the new frontier. “Westering fever” was already drawing Continue reading The Pioneers: Edwin Bryant