Redding or Reading?

Pierson B. Reading, the head fur trapper for Captain John Sutter in the early 1840s, was well known and respected in early California. He was the first known permanent settler in Shasta County, where he established a ranch on a 26,632- acre land grant awarded by Mexican Governor Micheltorena. Reading took part Continue reading Redding or Reading?

Durst Ranch Riot

During the 20th century California was a major producer of hops, that natural ingredient so essential to brewing beer. Before hop-picking machinery was invented in 1909 the mature, 18-foot-tall vines were harvested by hand during a six week period in the late summer, drawing hundreds of seasonal workers because it paid Continue reading Durst Ranch Riot

August Riots, 1850

Vandalism and petty acts of violence had been escalating in Sacramento for months before finally erupting in bloodshed on August 14, 1850, at the corner of 4th and J Streets. The hotly contented issue was property rights, and emotions on both sides were boiling over. A number of Gold Rush newcomers, dubbed “squatters” by existing landholders, contested John Sutter’s land Continue reading August Riots, 1850

Our Glorious 4th

Adopted by the Second Continental Congress on July 4, 1776, the Declaration of Independence announced that the thirteen American colonies then at war with the Kingdom of Great Britain would regard themselves as independent sovereign states no longer under British rule. The war for American independence, which had begun in 1775 with the Battle of Lexington and Concord, lasted through the Battle of Yorktown in 1781. Tomorrow, remember the thousands of Patriots who gave their lives for our liberty.

The Year to Come

As this New Year 2018 ushers in new opportunities and world-wide concerns, it is well to remember that history-making events don’t occur in a vacuum; they’re instigated by men and women chasing other ambitions or escaping from unsatisfactory conditions.  Christopher Columbus was looking for a sea passage Continue reading The Year to Come