CA Places: Sutterville

Today no longer in existence, Sutterville was proudly established in the mid-1840s by pioneer John Augustus Sutter. Hoping for and anticipating increased American immigration to California, he knew his fort’s trading post near the confluence of the Sacramento and American Rivers wouldn’t be adequate to supply Continue reading CA Places: Sutterville

Women Claim the Vote

Eagle on an American ShieldToday marks the 106th anniversary of California women winning the right to vote. Woman Suffrage, as the cause was termed, had strong opposition, and a similar measure had been defeated in 1896 by well-populated San Francisco and Alameda counties. In 1911, however, organized suffragists strategically targeted Southern California and small towns statewide. They visited churches, Continue reading Women Claim the Vote

San Francisco is Born

At the opening of 1847 the little hamlet known as Yerba Buena sat perched on a sheltered cove in San Francisco Bay. For a hundred years sailors had agreed it was the greatest harbor on earth, capable of comfortably accommodating all of the assembled navies of all of the nations of the world. As things were, it rarely harbored Continue reading San Francisco is Born

The Governor’s Mansion

California governors lived in their own private homes until 1903, when the state purchased and furnished a property at the corner of Sixteenth and H Streets in Sacramento as a home for California’s first families. The multi-story, Victorian-era Italianate-style residence was built in 1877 by Albert and Clemenza Continue reading The Governor’s Mansion

The Stanford Mansion

The loss of his law library to fire in 1852 prompted New York attorney Leland Stanford to migrate to California, to join brothers who were already successful merchants in Gold Rush Sacramento. Leland managed the Stanford Brother’s wholesale business on K Street, became wealthy, and involved himself in local politics.  In Continue reading The Stanford Mansion